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Biggayal
I'm super, thanks for asking.
~ Big Gay Al

Big Gay Al is a recurring side-character of the show South Park, created by Matt Stone and Trey Parker. Big Gay Al is Matt and Trey's quintessential take on homosexuals and like all such takes is painted as overblown and stereotypical. Big Gay Al first appeared in the episode "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride" where he attempts to moderate Stan's negative view of his dog being gay. Big Gay Al has appeared in several other episodes usually either as a comic relief or to stand up against homosexual discrimination. He has since been married to Mr. Garrison's former boyfriend Mr. Slave.

History

In his first appearance in "Big Gay Al's Big Gay Boat Ride", he ran an animal sanctuary reserved for gay animals who had been rejected by homophobic pet owners. He temporarily adopted Sparky, Stan Marsh's homosexual dog, who had run away from home after Stan had gotten upset with him. Stan then wanted Sparky back, and Big Gay Al agreed to return him, but only after explaining homosexuality to Stan. Later on in the episode, his large shelter transforms into a briefcase and flies away, but the various animals remained, and were taken back by their owners, who had missed them very much.


He had a minor role in South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut, where it was revealed that he is in fact a celebrity. He was the co-host and an entertainer at the troops' USO show, in which he performed his own musical number, "I'm Super". His singing voice for the song was provided by Trey Parker.


He later took up the position of scout master of troop 69, since he had been in the scouts since he was nine years old. However, the parents of the children were uneasy about a gay scout leader, and the club fired him. The boys, however, didn't like their new Scouts Leader, and rallied to get Al back, and Gloria Allred and others forced the Scouts to re-accept him. He rejected this, saying he knows the Scout leaders are still good men, and since the scouts are a private club, they should have the right to exclude people if they choose to, just as he has the right to express himself as a gay man.